Art meets transport in new bridge designed by Arne Quinze

Summary

Flemish visual artist Arne Quinze has designed the largest interactive art installation in the world for the Tomorrowland festival grounds

Everyone on the planet can help build “One World”

The provincial recreational domain De Schorre, best known for hosting the international dance festival Tomorrowland, will unveil a new bridge designed by Flemish visual artist Arne Quinze next year. The bridge’s design was inspired by the “Nike of Samothrace”, a 2000 BC marble statue with stretched wings that symbolises the victory of freedom.

The provincial recreational domain De Schorre, best-known for hosting the international dance festival Tomorrowland, will unveil a new bridge designed by Flemish visual artist Arne Quinze next year. The bridge’s design was inspired by the “Nike of Samothrace”, a 2000 BC marble stature with stretched wings that symbolises the victory of freedom.

Quinze’s public installation in Boom is meant to serve as a “bridge” between nature, music, the local environment and the world. It won’t include wings. Instead, Quinze will use glass windows in the steel construction, as a reference to the stained glass in Flanders’ cathedrals. All of this fits in nicely with the “natural chaos” concept the artist has been developing recently, as seen at his Chaos in Motion exhibition currently on show in Antwerp.

Unlike “The Sequence”, his public work in Brussels – the monumental canopy sculpture near the Flemish parliament and the already-demolished “City Scape”, the new “One World” installation is in Schorre to stay.

And everyone is invited to take part in its construction. Quinze always aims to provoke interaction with his large-scale sculptures – art in conversation with society, as it were. With space for 210,000 messages, visitors can leave a personal note on wooden slats that will be used in the construction of the bridge.

A personalised slat can be ordered through the project’s website for €10. This is Quinze’s idea of crowdfunding, which makes sense if you look at the the scope of the project: The bridge will be 537 metres long, use 160 tonnes of wood and 750 tonnes of steel and cost a total of €8.7 million.

Boom mayor Jeroen Baert says he’s proud to figure on the same list as Brussels, Rouen, Beirut and Shanghai – other cities where Quinze’s installations have made an impact on their surroundings. “Making art accessible for everyone is a smart initiative,” says Wendy Weckhuysen, mayor of the nearby Rumst.

Combining an artwork with a bike and pedestrian lane for daily use was also a selling point for Bruno Peeters, the province’s deputy for recreational domains. “It will be an attraction the whole year round,” he says.

According to Tomorrowland festival organisers Manu and Michiel Beers, One World will no doubt match the uniting and positive energy of their festival. “It’s going to be something very beautiful and unique,” they said in a statement. “This project will bring enormous added value to the area, domain and municipality.”

www.peopleoftomorrow.com

Photo credit: Tomorrowland

Summer music festivals

Offering everything from folk to techno, Flanders’ summer music festivals draw star performers and devout music fans from around the world. The most popular festivals are Rock Werchter, Pukkelpop and Tomorrowland.
Start - The summer festival season traditionally kicks off with the world and urban music festival Couleur Café in Brussels.
Number one - Flanders reportedly has more music festivals per capita than any other region in Europe.
Awards - Rock Werchter has won the ILMC Arthur industry award for “Best Festival” five times.
280

summer festivals in Flanders

13 500

square kilometres of total festival area

5

million ticket buyers