Applying for a job to become part of school curriculum

Summary

Flanders’ employment agency VDAB and the GO! education network at collaborating on a new secondary school class that would teach students about the value of preparing for a job search

Labour market “too far removed” from students

Flemish employment agency VDAB is co-operating with the community education network GO! to include an obligatory course in secondary schools on applying for a job. The focus will be on students in professional and technical education.

The programme would provide both practical information in terms of creating CVs and strategies in job interviews but also provide more theoretical help such as encouraging students to reflect on what they really want and are good at.

Through the co-operation with GO!, the VDAB hopes to get youngsters motivated about their future work at an earlier stage. “Applying for a job has too-long remained something that is far removed from the personal lives of youngsters,” VDAB spokesperson Bartelijne van den Boogert told De Morgen. VDAB also wants to prevent students receiving incorrect or outdated advice via other channels, such as from their parents.

Teachers would receive extra training in order to be able to deliver the lessons. “Teachers can estimate better than we can the competences of youngsters and whether their study choices are best for them,” said van den Boogert.

The idea is a direct response to high youth unemployment. “Youngsters are the most vulnerable group on the labour market,” said van den Boogert. “They are the first to get a job when the economy improves, but the first that have to leave in difficult times.” Youngers with few marketable skills or no higher education diploma have the most problems finding a job, he said.

Flanders’ employment agency VDAB and the GO! education network at collaborating on a new secondary school class that would teach students about the value of preparing for a job search.

LinkedIn this

Educational system

The Flemish educational system is divided into two levels: primary (age six to 12) and secondary school (12 to 18). Education is compulsory for children between the ages of six and 18.
Types - There are three educational networks in Flanders: the Flemish Community’s GO! network, and publicly funded education – either publicly or privately run.
Not enough space - In recent years, Flemish schools have been struggling with persistent teacher shortages and a growing lack of school spaces.
No tuition fees - Nursery, primary and secondary school are free in Flanders.
1

million school-going children in 2013

30

million euros Flemish education budget for new school infrastructures in 2013

11

percent of boys leaving secondary school without a diploma