Chicken House project promotes reading at schools

Summary

Pascal Smet read the first chapter of a children’s book to kids from 25 Flemish schools taking part in “Chicken House”, an initiative to encourage an interest in reading

Project aims to improve children’s reading skills

Flemish education minister Pascal Smet read the first chapter from the book De wolvenprinses (The Wolf Princess) to children from 25 schools during last Friday’s Grote Lees (Big Reading) event at the education department in Brussels.

The event was part of the “Chicken House” project, which wants to improve the reading skills of children in primary education and involve their parents. Chicken House is a British children’s book publishing company, popular with parents and educators for its knack at finding unique stories by new writers.

Over the past few weeks, more than 1,000 pupils from 25 Flemish schools read Chicken House’s Klauwhand, a translation of the English-language book Claws, and set up all kinds of creative initiatives around the book, together with parents.

The Grote Lees included musical theatre performances and photo shoots for the children. Minister Smet presented De wolvenprinses, the second book offered to schools for collective reading and ensuing projects. “Reading is a good way to improve language competences and opens the door to full participation in society,” said Smet.

Chicken House project wants to improve reading skills of children in primary education and involve their parents.

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