Crevits “shocked” by amount of admin teachers face

Summary

New Flemish education minister Hilde Crevits, the daughter of teachers, wants to improve the situation of teachers in the region, who she says are bogged down by paperwork and excessive rules

“Regulationitis”

Flanders’ new education minister, Hilde Crevits (pictured), was “really shocked” when she discovered the amount of administrative work demanded of teachers and the regulations to which they are subject. “If we are to give them our trust, we need to do something about that pressure,” she said earlier this week in an interview with education magazine Klasse.

Both of Crevits’ parents were teachers, and she feels a special connection to education, she said, and detects “a deep-rooted feeling of being undervalued”.

Surveys show, however, that three out of four Flemings have confidence in teachers. “A good deal more than most other professional groups,” said Crevits. “I want to strengthen that confidence in the coming years. But I also want teachers to know that they are valued and have our confidence.”

Part of that work will include cutting down on administration for teachers and making teaching plans simpler. “A report was published last year, with recommendations,” she said. A reporting line for excessive paperwork is already in place, where teachers can report cases of what the minister called “regulationitis”.

Photo courtesy Klasse

New Flemish education minister Hilde Crevits, the daughter of teachers, wants to improve the situation of teachers in the region, who she says are bogged down by paperwork and excessive rules.

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Educational system

The Flemish educational system is divided into two levels: primary (age six to 12) and secondary school (12 to 18). Education is compulsory for children between the ages of six and 18.
Types - There are three educational networks in Flanders: the Flemish Community’s GO! network, and publicly funded education – either publicly or privately run.
Not enough space - In recent years, Flemish schools have been struggling with persistent teacher shortages and a growing lack of school spaces.
No tuition fees - Nursery, primary and secondary school are free in Flanders.
1

million school-going children in 2013

30

million euros Flemish education budget for new school infrastructures in 2013

11

percent of boys leaving secondary school without a diploma