Leuven researchers identify cause of dyslexia

Summary

Researchers at the University of Leuven have discovered a disconnect between different parts of the brain in people with dyslexia. The discovery could lead to a new treatment

Language and sounds are not connecting

Defective communication between different parts of the brain triggers the development of dyslexia, not the incorrect registration of sounds in the brain. That is the conclusion of researchers at the University of Leuven (KU Leuven), after they examined the brain functioning of 50 adults, of which half suffered from dyslexia.

Using MRI scans, the team monitored the brain activity of participants while they listened to sounds of speech. Surprisingly to the researchers, the registration of the sounds was the same for everyone. However, they discovered that parts of the brain responsible for language processing had problems connecting to areas that register the sounds.

The new insight means that brain stimulation therapy, in which different parts of the brain are simultaneously stimulated, could help dyslexic patients.

Leuven researchers identify cause of dyslexia that could lead to a new treatment.

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University of Leuven

Established almost six centuries ago, the University of Leuven (KU Leuven) is one of the oldest universities in the Low Countries. International rankings consistently place it among the best universities in Europe.
Papal founding - It was founded as a Catholic university by Pope Martin V in 1425.
Bright minds - Over the centuries, it attracted famous scholars like Justus Lipsius, Andreas Vesalius, Desiderius Erasmus and Gerard Mercator.
Micro and nano - KU Leuven is home to the Interuniversity Microelectronics Centre (imec), a world-class research centre in micro- and nanoelectronics.
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million euros in annual research budget