New ecoGator app shows energy efficiency of appliances

Summary

Environmental organisation Bond Beter Leefmilieu has launched an app that helps users assess the energy consumption of electricity-powered devices

App will be released in 10 countries

Flemish environmental group Bond Beter Leefmilieu has launched a mobile application that it hopes will help consumers better understand how much energy household appliances really use. The ecoGator app is part of a European initiative and will be rolled out in 10 countries this fall.

To learn how much electricity an appliance will likely use, prospective buyers simply need to hold their smartphone’s camera over the European energy label on the device. The ecoGator app subsequently reads and processes the data on the label and immediately shows the energy cost of the appliance. The app can also determine the appliance’s energy cost per year and includes a functionality that allows different devices to be compared.

It is hoped that the app will raise awareness among consumers that a fridge with an A+ label for instance actually isn’t as energy efficient as they might think at a surface glance. According to Bond Beter Leefmilieu, the A+ label is currently the worst label on the market.

“The app will show you that a fridge with an A+ label will after 15 years have an energy cost of €544, while a fridge with an A+++ label will have an energy cost of €180,” Sara Van Dyck, energy expert at Bond Beter Leefmilieu, said in a press statement.

The organisation also called for increased attention to structural energy savings and a sustainable energy future in the light of the recent closure of the Doel 4 nuclear facility and the possibility of power shortages this winter. “Then we don’t need brownout plans,” Van Dyck said.  “Choosing the right appliances is one of those necessary structural measures that help to avoid black-outs,” she said.

Photo courtesy ecoGator

Environmental organisation Bond Beter Leefmilieu has launched an app that helps users understand the energy consumption of electricity-powered devices.

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