Face of Flanders — Investment

Summary

If you won the Belgian national lottery, what would you do with the money? You’ll have to decide quickly because investment bankers and charities will soon be dialling your number.

If you won the Belgian national lottery, what would you do with the money? You’ll have to decide quickly because investment bankers and charities will soon be dialling your number.

Fortunately, there’s Investment, a new stage production that will help you traverse the rocky road of richness. Several short PowerPoint presentations will lead you through all the many spending possibilities – from giving to Stop Hunger Now to investing in stem cell research. All of the options on show are completely real – even if the performances of them are much more fun that talking to a real investment banker.

And the best part? You’ll be holding a lottery ticket right in your hand, which you’ll be given at the beginning of the show.

Davis Freeman wrote and staged Investment as “a tool to talk about all these things – like how you can invest in a company right here in Belgium that supplies the American military with all its guns.” People become alarmed at the responsibility of suddenly having so much money, but “you also have a lot of power,” says Freeman. “And we’re going to tell you what you can do with all that power.”

You’ll also find out what €100,000 can buy you, such as four kilos of cocaine, a breast enlargement or a sports car. “What attracts you or doesn’t attract you?” questions Freeman. “The idea is not to tell you what you should do but lay out the options to see where you place yourself.”

Davis and three other actors (including Jerry Killick, pictured) also do a section on investing in dance and theatre, with accompanying performances to illustrate where your money goes. This includes a scene from Ronald Harwood’s emotional play Taking Sides about the de-Nazification of artists who stayed in Germany during the war.

“The subjects are about the battle between art and politics,” explains Freeman. The 40-year-old came to Belgium 15 years ago “to see what my sister was doing.” His sister happens to be choreographer Meg Stuart, founder of Brussels-based company Damaged Goods. Following her lead, he fell in love with the city and never left. Besides being frequently seen on stage in productions by Stuart, Forced Entertainment and Superamas, he founded his own performance group, Random Scream, 10 years ago.

Investment is part of the Working Title festival. For more info on the festival, see here.

www.randomscream.be

 

 

Face of Flanders — Investment

LinkedIn this